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Professor Rebecca Lingwood

rebecca_webProfessor Rebecca Lingwood joined Brunel University London as Provost (and Professor of Fluid Dynamics) in August 2018 from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) where she was Vice-Principal for Education and Professor of Fluid Dynamics. 

Rebecca has a successful track record of combining research and education with supporting partnerships between academia and private-, public- and third-sector organizations.  She researches laminar-turbulent transition of complex fluid flows, and holds a guest professorship at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, where her research group is based. She continues to publish widely in her field and has served on several national and international review panels and boards. Rebecca is a trustee of the Daphne Jackson Trust, Fellow of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers and of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and Principal Fellow of the HEA.

In earlier years, Rebecca graduated in Engineering from the University of Cambridge and, after completing her PhD, was awarded a Maudslay Research Fellowship and then a Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship in Cambridge. She then held a number of posts in Oxford, before returning to Cambridge in 2009 to become Director of the Institute of Continuing Education, Warden of Madingley Hall and hold a number of university-wide roles. During this time, Rebecca led the establishment of the University Technical College (UTC) Cambridge on behalf of Cambridge University Health Partners, becoming Founding Member and Vice-Chair of Governors.

In 2015, Rebecca joined QMUL and, in addition to her substantive roles, was Chair of the Estates Strategy Board and had senior executive oversight of QMUL’s two sponsored two multi-academy trusts (MATs); she led the process of academization of two schools and, in parallel, the formation of one of these MATs, becoming the founding Chair of the MAT Board. Rebecca is a member of the Universities UK TEF Working Group and is co-lead of a Universities UK-sponsored project looking at the effect of social background on graduate success.