Exit Menu

Assessment

Guidance

In order to be recommended for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), Student Teachers must demonstrate that they meet the requirements of the Teachers’ Standards (DFE, 2013). These are mapped into all University teaching as well as underpinning all school based work. The Profile document (explained later in this section) is completed collaboratively by the Student Teacher, PCM, Mentor and University Tutors at 6 assessment points, assessing the Student Teacher against the Teachers’ Standards. Evidence for the Profile is gathered in two distinct ways:

  1. By regularly monitoring Student Teacher progress toward the attainment of Teachers’ Standards during the school experiences through documents such as the Lesson Feedback Records (LFRs) and Weekly Professional Learning Records (WPLRs)
  2. Through the identification of Best Evidence by the Student Teacher.

Please refer to the Teachers’ Standards for further details. 

Expected outcomes and progress towards meeting Teachers' Standards

This assessment section sets out how the Student Teachers’ progress to being an outstanding teacher will be tracked and reviewed and how their ongoing achievement and final attainment will be assessed. It contains the resources to support Student Teachers, class teachers, Mentors, and University Tutors recording progress.

It is intended to:

  • secure accuracy and consistency of judgements;
  • ensure a shared language for discussing the progress and professional development of Student Teachers;
  • support effective tracking of Student Teacher progress against the Teachers’ Standards;
  • enable challenging short and longer term development target setting and achieving.

Programme Outcomes

By the end of the course the expectation is that:

  • all Student Teachers awarded QTS will attain  at least ‘good’ and the majority will be ‘outstanding’;
  • any Student Teacher whose attainment is judged requires improvement (RI) will have to undertake additional professional learning. 

 Auditing and assessing progress

Student Teachers will be formally assessed at 6 assessment points during the course of their school experience (i.e. Foundation, Development and Consolidation/End of Course). At each formal assessment point, grades will be agreed for the assessment point or for final attainment. One set of consistent assessment criteria is used at each assessment point and it is expected that a significant number of Student Teachers will, at the first assessment point, be graded as requiring improvement as they are at the beginning of their professional learning. Student Teachers need to understand these expectations and the significant achievement they will have made in securing the minimum level of practice by the first assessment point. Those working with Student Teachers across the Partnership will need to identify what is needed to ensure progress between each assessment point through target setting.

Assessing Student Teachers: important considerations

  • The key factor in judging the quality of teaching over time is the impact teaching has on the quality of learning of pupils/learners.  (‘Initial teacher education inspection handbook’, March 2015, Paragraph 1256
  • When assessing the quality of primary and secondary Student Teachers’ teaching over time, reference should be made to the Teachers’ Standards in full (‘Initial teacher education inspection handbook’, March 2015, Paragraph 126).  The bulleted sub-headings should be used to:
  • Track progress against the Teachers’ Standards;*
  • Determine areas for additional development;*
  • Identify strengths which indicate excellent practice;*
  • Enable the identification of aspects of, for example, outstanding practice for ‘Good’ (grade 2) Student Teachers and good practice for those  with ‘Requires improvement’ (grade 3) in order to show that they are exceeding the minimum in aspects of the Teachers’ Standards.

* ‘Initial teacher education inspection handbook’, March 2015, Paragraph 129, paraphrased.

  • ‘The standards need to be applied as appropriate to the role and context within which a Student Teacher or teacher is practising.  Providers of initial teacher training (ITT) should assess Student Teachers against the standards in a way that is consistent with what could reasonably be expected of a Student Teacher prior to the award of QTS.’  (‘Teachers’ Standards’, Paragraph 6)
  • Student Teacher’s’ teaching over time should be assessed in relation to:
  1. the impact they have on the progress and learning over time of the pupils for which they are responsible;
  2. the context and content of their teaching, over sequences of lessons; the quality of teaching must be judged in terms of attainment in relation to the relevant Teachers’ Standards and not on individual lessons.
  • Assessment must be informed by evidenced, professional judgements which are accurate and rigorous.  Judgements need to be based on the quality of the Student Teacher’s’ teaching overall and reflect their impact on pupil progress and learning over time.  Weaknesses or strengths in some of the Teachers’ Standards may have significant impact on performance in others.  It is essential that all grades, comments (regarding student teacher and pupil progress and learning) and targets are aligned with the grade descriptors for the grade being awarded.
  • All Student Teachers should be prepared in accordance with C2.2 of the ‘Initial teacher training criteria’, June 2015, and engage with the expectations, curricula, strategies and teaching arrangements in the age ranges immediately before and after the ones they are trained to teach.

When making judgements, the full range of evidence should be utilised, including planning, discussions with trainees and pupils, pupils’ responses in lessons and in their work books, the quality and impact of Student Teacher’s’ marking and feedback, their assessment and planning records and evidence of their own and their pupils’ progress and learning over time.

 Annual assessment process at a glance

Annual assessment process

Guidance for the weekly meetings: reviewing progress and asessment

On a weekly basis whilst in school, Student Teachers must be observed teaching and have a formal weekly review meeting with their mentor. This will feature discussion about the Student Teachers’ and pupils’ well- being and be a celebration of successes and classroom highlights based on fostering pupil curiosity and the love of learning.

Student Teachers must bring evidence of their progress and the progress and learning of the pupils they teach for discussion and appraisal. This evidence will include lesson feedback records (LFRs and evidence of engagement in a wide range of professional learning activities (PLAs). The review of this evidence and the setting of ongoing targets is to be documented in the Weekly Professional Learning Record (WPLR).

The following need to be considered when evaluating the quality of Student Teachers’ teaching over time and its impact:

  • the context and content of the sessions/lessons; where they fit within a sequence of lessons;
  • the contribution of Student Teachers’ teaching to the learning of the pupils and the progress they make over time: good pupil progress = Outstanding, expected pupil progress = Good; some pupil progress = RI. If pupils are not making any progress over time this is inadequate.
  • observations of pupils, pupils’ responses in lessons and pupils’ workbooks, with particular reference to the quality and impact of the Student Teachers’ marking, the Student Teachers’ assessment records and annotated planning; Student Teachers’ strengths against the Teachers’ Standards and sub-headings of the Teachers’ Standards and how they can improve. It is critical to avoid an atomistic approach; initial discussions should focus on the quality of the Student Teachers’ teaching and its impact on pupils’ progress and learning over time and the aspects of the Student Teachers’ teaching which support this or need to be developed further. This can then be mapped to the Teachers’ Standards.

Each weekly meeting should also include:

  • Monitoring of impact and progress;
  • Reviewing and agreeing appropriately challenging short and longer term developmental targets, along with agreeing and recording what needs to be done by the Student Teacher and others to enable him/her to achieve his/her targets. Targets need to be fit for purpose, have a focus on the Teachers’ Standards and, as appropriate, be subject-specific. Targets should be written using the language of the Teachers’ Standards and grade descriptors;
  • Identifying evidence of progress;
  • Agreeing and recording related professional learning activities and actions;
  • Agreeing and recording the impact of the professional learning on the Student Teachers’ teaching and, consequently, on pupil progress and learning over time.
  • Review of evidence in school experience files.

Target setting and achieving targets

Central to Student Teacher progress is the agreement of accurate targets to enable them to improve their practice and the contribution they make to pupil progress. The targets need to have a clear purpose and be related to specific aspects of teaching as identified through the Teachers’ Standards and including subject specificity when appropriate. To support Student Teachers in achieving the targets the actions to be taken by the Student Teacher and others must be agreed. This can be supported through a wide range of different kinds of Professional Learning Activities (PLAs), directly associated to effective lesson delivery and supporting pupil progress and actions which might involve broader Standards related learning opportunities outside direct lesson delivery. The Brunel University London Teacher Education Partnership provides guidance on a range of different PLAs in the Professional Learning section of this handbook. How and when progress against the targets set for Student Teachers will be identified and reviewed also needs to be agreed.

As such, targets for Student Teachers are layered as follows:

  • Short term targets from lessons (detailed on the Lesson Feedback Record (LFR))
  • Slightly longer term targets from weekly meetings (detailed on the Weekly Professional Learning Record (WPLR))
  • Assessment point targets (detailed at the interim and end phases on the Profile document)
  • NQT targets (detailed on the Transition Profile document).

It is essential that targets are closely cross referenced to the Teachers’ Standards related criteria detailed in this assessment section. The targets should set an aspiration for Student Teacher achievement and attainment by using language associated to the grade descriptors pitched above those that are currently being achieved. Please note that we provide descriptors for lessons which are cross referenced to the generic Teachers Standards descriptors used by the Partnership.

Targets should be recorded with reference to the well-established SMART guidance below.

Targets

Specific (precise), Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-constrained targets will enable the trainee to:

  • build on his/her identified strengths;
  • support his/her impact on pupil progress and learning over time;
  • achieve the Teachers’ Standards.

Targets should be subject-specific where appropriate.

Targets should be written using the language of the Teachers’ Standards and the grade descriptors.

Success criteria

What will be demonstrated and how when the target is achieved.

 

Target specific training and actions

Actions that the student teacher and others need to take in order for him/her to achieve the target. 

Actions must be realistic and achievable within the resources available.  Consideration must be given to the level of available support.

Resources

Resources required to support the student teacher, including the time that will be allocated for development opportunities.  For example, teacher modelling, focussed observations, visits/targeted support from lead practitioners, etc.

Target dates

Target dates for achieving the target which are realistic and manageable.

Target dates can relate to the trainee’s current school, an alternative school placement or, possibly, the employing school for NQT induction depending on the timing of the target.

Review of dates

When progress will next be evaluated; this is usually the date of the next weekly review meeting.

 

Things to consider when setting targets

Specific (precise)

 

Beclear about what you want the trainee to achieve and why; for example, impact on pupil progress and learning over time, subject knowledge development, etc. (linked to the relevant Teachers’ Standards and grade descriptors).

 

Measurable/Achievable

 

Pitched at an achievable (realistic) level and modelled so that the trainee can understand how to achieve the target.  Appropriate levels of challenge and support should be provided which link to clearly identified success criteria.

 

Realistic

 

In terms of the context, is there the time, the opportunity and the resources available to achieve the target?  Can this target be met alongside other targets that the trainee may already be working towards?

 

Time-constrained

 

Targets should be achievable within a stated time period, with explicit steps for successful achievement.

The Profile document: guidance for interim and end-of-phase assessments

The Profile provides a record of the holistic picture of progress made by the Student Teacher towards meeting the Teachers' Standards:

• Part One: Teaching

• Part Two: Personal and Professional Conduct

Assessment Points

There are six assessment points during the course:

1. The interim stage of the Foundation Phase

2. The end of the Foundation Phase

3. The interim stage of the Development Phase

4. The end of the Development Phase

5. The interim stage of the Consolidation Phase

6. The final stage of the Consolidation Phase and the end of the course

Assessment points are as follows for all phases and routes, including Core PGCE Student Teachers opting for an alternative setting placement:                        

Assessment point

Phase

Date for students – Core

Date for students – Alternative Setting

1

Foundation Interim

 

w/b 20th November 2017

w/b 20th November 2017

2

Foundation – end of phase

w/b 18th December 2017

w/b 18th December 2017

3

Development Interim

 

w/b 26th February 2018

w/b 26th February 2018

4

Development – end of phase

w/b 26th March 2018

w/b 26th March 2018

5

Consolidation Interim

 

w/b 7th May 2018

w/b 23rd April 2018

6

Consolidation – end of phase

w/b 11th June 2018

w/b 11th June 2018

Interim and End of Phase Assessment Process

At each assessment point, an assessment will be made of the Student Teacher’s progress towards meeting the Teachers’ Standards. At the interim stage in the Foundation, Development and Consolidation Phases, (points 1, 3 and 5 above) the Student Teacher and Mentor will agree a grade for each of the Teachers’ Standards and targets will be set through the LFRs and WPLRs. At the Interim point, a holistic grade is recorded for each Teachers’ Standard and a comment provided when RI or I is given in particular if interventions are required to support improvements upon this grade before the end of the phase. Each Teachers’ Standard has a series of descriptors for each section of the Standard to assist in the assessment process and to support effective target setting. The grading rationale is explained earlier in this section on assessment.

The summary for Part 1: Teaching and Part 2: Personal and Professional Conduct should be completed at the interim and end of phases, as indicated above.

If, at any stage, the Mentor or University/Link Tutors feel that inadequate progress is being made in either of parts 1 or 2, a ‘Support and Intervention’ must be triggered and procedures outlined in the guidance followed accordingly.

At the end of each phase, the Student Teacher is required to self-assess progress towards each Teachers’ Standard, whilst also reviewing targets set at the interim stage, where applicable. They are to provide a brief rationale, making reference to relevant evidence in the Best Evidence Record. After the Mentor has completed the Mentor assessment and rationale in the same way, both the Student Teacher and Mentor collaborate to agree a grade for the Teachers’ Standard and targets for the next phase.

The targets indicated at the end of the phase assessment are to inform the Professional Learning Action Plan. At the end of the Consolidation Phase, final grades are given for each of the Teachers’ Standards, followed by a final best fit overall grade for the final placement.

The Summary Profile for both parts 1 and part 2 are to be completed and if evidence indicates that inadequate progress is being made in either part, then the ‘Support and Intervention’ process must be instigated with an accompanying action plan, as specified in the guidance.

The assessment data gathered at these assessment points is particularly important in tracking Student Teachers’ progression towards the fulfilment of the Teachers’ Standards. It also serves an essential transitional function as Student Teachers move from one school experience to another: so, for Core Student Teachers, the transition out of the Foundation Phase into the Development Phase, and for those following School Direct routes at the mid-point and end-point of the Development Phase, when they affect their transition into the alternative setting school and then back into their Lead school.

 Grading rationale and guidance for using the grade descriptors

Grading Rationale

This grading rationale is based on the Ofsted criteria for judging the quality of outcomes for Student Teachers, set out in the Initial Teacher Education Inspection Handbook (Ofsted, March 2015). It is essential that those assessing Student Teachers use their professional judgement when making and agreeing decisions focusing on the quality of the Student Teachers’ teaching overall. All borderline cases must be reviewed, taking into account all relevant evidence as necessary.

Outstanding (O)

The Student Teacher demonstrates excellent practice in the majority of the Standards for teaching as defined in the Teachers’ Standards and all related to their personal and professional conduct. Much of the quality of Student Teacher’s teaching over time is outstanding and never less than consistently good.

For an individual Student Teacher’s final grading to be Outstanding:

  • Minimum 4 Standards graded Outstanding overall, features of outstanding practice in other Standards (using assessment against the subheadings)
  • No grade Requires Improvement (RI) or Inadequate (I) for any Standard
  • Excellent practice in part two, regarding personal and professional conduct.

Good (G)

The Student Teacher exceeds the minimum level of practice expected of teachers as defined in the Teachers’ Standards. The Student Teacher demonstrates excellent practice in some of the Standards for Teaching and all related to their personal and professional conduct. Much of the quality of Student Teacher’s teaching overtime is good, some is outstanding.

For an individual Student Teacher’s final grading to be Good:

  • Much of their teaching is good over time, there are features of Outstanding practice in some Standards (using assessment against the criteria in the subheadings)*
  • Any RIs given full consideration and would need to have Good features, no Inadequate for any Standard
  • Excellent practice in part two re personal and professional conduct.

Final judgement is to be agreed following discussion by relevant members of the Partnership with close scrutiny of any RI and O aspects.

*Careful consideration must be given where a Student Teacher has all of their teaching in ‘good’ but limited or no outstanding aspects as they are likely to be good overall.

Requires Improvement (RI)

The Student Teacher meets the minimum level of practice expected of teachers as defined in the Teachers’ Standards. The Student Teacher’s teaching requires improvement as it is not yet good.

For an individual Student Teacher teacher’s final grading to be RI:

  • Mostly RIs and no Is
  • A Student Teacher can be judged above the minimum if they have evidenced features of good practice in aspects of Standards and no Is
  • A Student Teacher in this category may be identified as a needing ‘Support and Intervention’ BUT this is subject to expectations for progress and attainment detailed below for each phase of the course and determined on an individualized basis.

As early as possible and as soon as a potential RI is identified, the PCM, Link Tutor and University Tutor must be alerted and immediate interventions, including sharply focused longer and short term targets for the Student Teacher, are to be agreed and recorded and explicit professional learning actions defined and monitored. Weekly updates should be maintained. The intervention for progress to good may continue

beyond the end of the official placement and in to NQT year. Additional moderation and rigorous documentation are essential. A Support and Intervention may be initiated at this stage.

Inadequate (I)

The Student Teacher has failed to meet the minimum level of practice expected of teachers as defined in the Teachers’ Standards. The quality of the Student Teacher’s teaching over time is weak such that it contributes to pupils/ learners or groups of pupils/learners making inadequate progress.

As early is possible and as soon as a potential I is identified, the PCM, Link Tutor and University Tutor must be alerted and immediate intervention, including sharply focused longer and short term targets for the Student Teacher, are to be agreed and recorded and explicit professional learning actions defined and monitored. A Support and Intervention process will be initiated at this stage. Weekly updates should be maintained. At the end of the course, the Student Teacher would not be awarded QTS or progress to the NQT year. Additional moderation and rigorous documentation are essential.

Please note: If a Student Teacher walks out of a school experience placement, having not followed all expected lines of communication and reporting to address any Support and Intervention issues, as detailed in the step by step process outlined in this handbook, then this will normally constitute an Inadequate grade profile and result in a failed placement. Based upon existing data, it is expected that the profile of the Student Teacher might develop as follows:

By the end of the Foundation Phase:

  • All Student Teachers will meet the minimum level of practice, taking into account what can reasonably be expected at this stage of the programme
  • Some Student Teachers will require improvement through intensive and targeted advice and support to move their teaching to good /outstanding as their teaching is not yet good
  • A number of Students Teachers’ teaching will be judged over time as good and they will need targeted advice and support to ensure greater consistency and to move their teaching to outstanding
  • A small number of Student Teachers’ teaching will be judged over time as outstanding and never less than consistently good; they will have targeted advice and support to ensure that they maintain this consistency and continue to develop their teaching
  • If a Student Teacher has made unsatisfactory progress in one or more of the Teachers’ Standards, his/her progress to the next phase of the course will be reviewed at examination board on an individual basis.

By the end of the Development Phase:

  • All Student Teachers will meet the minimum level of practice expected
  • A small number of Student Teachers will require improvement through intensive and targeted advice and support to move their teaching to good /outstanding as their teaching is not yet good,
  • Some Student Teachers’ teaching will be judged over time as good. They will need targeted advice and support to ensure greater consistency and to move their teaching to outstanding
  • The remainder of Student Teachers’ teaching will be judged over time as outstanding, they will have targeted advice and support to ensure that they maintain this consistency and continue to develop their teaching
  • If a Student Teacher has made unsatisfactory progress in one or more of the Teachers’ Standards, his/her progress to the next phase of the course will be reviewed at examination board on an individual basis.

By the end of the Consolidation Phase (end of programme):

  • All Student Teachers will meet the minimum level of practice expected
  • No Student Teachers should require improvement. In the exception, intensive and targeted advice and support will be provided to move their teaching to good; extending the placement and into the NQT year and employing school as required
  • For some – over time much of their teaching will be good they will have agreed targets to take in to their NQT year and employing school to meet outstanding.
  • The majority of Student Teachers’ teaching will be judged as outstanding; they will have agreed targets advice to ensure that they maintain this consistency and continue to develop their teaching to take into their employing school.
  • If a Student Teacher has made unsatisfactory progress in one or more of the Teachers’ Standards, his/her progress to the next phase of the course will be reviewed at examination board on an individual basis.

Strengths and targets will be shared with the employing school or setting through the Transition and Professional Learning Action Plan. The Brunel University London Teacher Education Partnership will offer ongoing support as required. The Brunel University London ITE Partnership Teachers’ Standards Grade Descriptors: Guidance

The Teachers’ Standards and the subheadings have been set out within the Partnership’s grade descriptors. The grade descriptors are linked to the Ofsted criteria for assessing outcomes for Student Teachers in the Ofsted ITE Handbook (Ofsted, March 2015). The grade descriptors have an essential role in ensuring and monitoring accuracy and consistency of judgements of Student Teachers’ progress, achievement and final attainment, and providing a shared language to discuss Student Teachers’ progress through their training programme and into their NQT year.

The grade descriptors are intended to enable Student Teachers, Mentors, PCMs, University Tutors:

  • Discuss and track Student Teachers’ progress against the Teachers’ Standards
  • Highlight areas of strength
  • Identify short- and longer-term development targets
  • Make informed judgements at review points
  • Achieve accurate formative and summative assessment
  • Support rigorous use of evidence
  • Provide a formal recording mechanism for Student Teachers’ progress
  • Identify strengths and areas for development in order to ensure a smooth transition from ITE to the NQT year and induction.

The grade descriptors should be used formatively at weekly meetings to review teaching overall and highlight areas for development and areas of progress, referenced in progress noted and ongoing weekly targets. They should also be used at each of the 6 assessment points to review interim and end of phase progress and attainment and again to set targets.

Accuracy in grading: the alignment of grades, progress, comments and targets

In assessing Student Teachers, it is essential that the developing quality of both their teaching and their impact on pupil progress and learning over time is fully captured in both grades and comments. It is essential that there is a clear alignment across:

  • The overall grade awarded;
  • The grades awarded for individual Standards;
  • Related commentaries;
  • Appropriate targets – these should be precise and subject-specific;
  • The tracking of progress.

At the weekly meeting, mentors and Student Teachers need to take this alignment into consideration when completing the review of progress and assessment. When preparing Profiles at the 6 assessment points, it is important that Student Teachers and mentors ensure that there is clear evidence of:

  • pupil progress and learning over time informing the overall grade;
  • the actual quality of the Student Teachers’ teaching over time informing the overall grade;
  • the grading of individual Teachers’ Standards informing the overall grade;
  • the comments and related targets* corresponding to the evidence and the overall grading;
  • the accurate use of the grade descriptors and the language used therein;
  • the interim and end of phase Profiles clearly building on the Student Teachers’ developing profile as evidenced in the above and through tracking. 

 Support and intervention guidance

What is a Support and Intervention?

There may be occasions in University and/or school when the performance of a Student Teacher is such that additional action is required beyond the normal systems of support and assessment. On these occasions, the Support and Intervention process may be activated by the University, the School or by the Student Teacher. Please note, there are two types of Support and Intervention, the first described at Stage 1 below and the second at Stage 3.

Why may the Support and Intervention process be activated?

The purpose of initiating the Support and Intervention process is to make certain that the Student Teacher is aware of the concerns at the earliest possible stage in order that an appropriate support action plan can be agreed. In many cases, the additional focus and support enables a Student Teacher to continue to progress in the expected manner and it is not viewed as a punitive step.

Please note, we reserve the right to over-ride these processes if concerns are raised over safeguarding.

Who can activate the Support and Intervention process?

The University

If the University has concerns about a Student Teacher’s progress or professional conduct within the University context the Support and Intervention process may be activated in relation to, for example:

  • attendance and/or punctuality;
  • completion of school based activities, tasks and enrichment activities arranged by the University;
  • meeting deadlines for submission of key documents;
  • maintaining appropriate professional conduct with all University and school staff.

In the first instance, the University Tutor will discuss these with the Student Teacher. This may lead to the University Tutor/Course Leader raising a Support and Intervention.

A Link Tutor acting on behalf of the University can also instigate the Support and Intervention process within the context of the school placement.

The Placement School

If a placement school has concerns about a Student Teacher’s progress and/or professional conduct, then in the first instance the Mentor in the placement school should discuss these issues with the Student Teacher. This is part of the process of monitoring progress against the Teachers’ Standards and addressing any concerns. Depending on the nature of the worries, this may lead to activating Stage 1 Support and Intervention, followed, after an agreed timescale, by either a resolution without any further action or the instigation of more detailed Support and Intervention at Stage 3. Exact details are given below.

The Student Teacher

If Student Teachers have concerns about their own progress towards the Teachers’ Standards and have identified that they require additional support they may also initiate the Support and Intervention process themselves.

Please note: If a Student Teacher walks out of a school experience placement, having not followed all expected lines of communication and reporting to address any Support and Intervention issues (as detailed in the step by step process outlined in this handbook) then this will normally constitute an Inadequate grade profile and result in a failed placement, with no automatic right to a resit.

What can trigger the Support and Intervention process?

A Support and Intervention could be issued for the following possible areas of concern:

Likely relevant Teacher Standards

Area of concern

 

Examples

 

TS2, TS3, TS4, TS7, TS8

Part One: Teaching

A Student Teacher does not make the expected progress despite appropriate support over time;

A Student Teacher shows that they are not meeting the Teachers’ Standards, when they have been guided on how to do so.

 

  • Interim assessment grades show RI (excluding FSE) and/or I
  • WPLRs indicate a lack of progress towards identified targeted TS over a period of time
  • If a Student Teacher ‘plateaus’ and there is no evidence of further progress or development in the quality of their teaching;

 

Part Two: Personal and professional conduct.

A Student Teacher fails to demonstrate high standards of personal and professional conduct. (This is applicable to both University and School).

 

  • Poor attendance or punctuality
  • Inability to follow correct procedures and policies (eg appropriate dress code)
  • Lack of self-awareness,
  • Inability or unwillingness to accept professional feedback
  • Inability to develop and maintain effective relationships with all staff

What are the stages of the Support and Intervention process?

This process is outlined below:

Stage 1: Activating Initial Support and Intervention

  • At the earliest opportunity, the mentor or university staff member discusses and documents concerns with the Student Teacher.
  • The member of staff and the Student Teacher agree strategies to remediate the concern together with the timescale, targets and actions.
  • The concerns, targets and actions for the Student Teacher must be recorded in Section 2 of the Weekly Professional Learning Record (W.P.L.R).
    • If the concern has been raised by a member of school staff, the Subject/Link Tutor is included in discussion (possibly by email) and monitors as appropriate.

Stage 2: Reviewing Stage 1 Support and Intervention

  • Mentor, Student Teacher (and Link Tutor, as appropriate) review targets using the full range of evidence.
  • If the agreed targets and actions have been met, and evidence supports this judgement, the Stage 1 Support and Intervention can be concluded and normal professional learning routines continue.
  • If insufficient progress has been made, proceed to Stage 3.
  • The Link tutor is informed of outcome of Stage 1 Support and Intervention.

Stage 3: Setting up Support and Intervention agreement and Action Plan

  • Member of School Leadership Team (PCM) and Link Tutor informed that concerns detailed in Stage 1 have not yet been resolved.
  • Joint review meeting (and observation where appropriate) with the Mentor and Subject/Link Tutor. Subject/Link tutor moderates the evidence with the Mentor to confirm whether there is a need for an ongoing Support and Intervention. If so, a formal meeting with the Subject/Link Tutor, Mentor and Student Teacher takes place to agree the Support and Intervention and set revised targets.
  • The Support and Intervention documentation is completed by staff and student teacher and emailed to all relevant parties. This includes Part A, the Support and Intervention Agreement and Part B, the Action Plan (see below). A copy is held by the PCM or other senior school leader and the University.
  • An agreed period of time is set for the Student Teacher to focus on the Support and Intervention targets.
  • Explicit actions for the Student Teacher, Mentor and or Subject/Link Tutor are agreed and documented on the Support and Intervention Agreement and Action Plan.
  • All observations and review meetings should focus on the Support and Intervention targets and judgements against these should be recorded on both W.P.L.R.s and Lesson Feedback Record/s.

Stage 4: Review of Support and Intervention Action Plan

  • At the end of the specified timescale, a formal review of targets takes place, by the Student Teacher, Mentor and Subject/Link Tutor who will use the full range of evidence.
  • A decision is reached as to which of the three possible outcomes has been demonstrated:

i) If sufficient progress has been made, the Support and Intervention ends and the normal professional learning routines continue;

ii) If partial progress has been made, the Subject/Link Tutor, Mentor and Student Teacher review the issues, revise the targets and the Support and Intervention is extended; extension of the Support and Intervention may only happen once unless there are exceptional circumstances agreed by the Course Leader/s. Further review is arranged following the agreed extension period, and a further joint lesson observation is arranged (as appropriate) to support the subsequent judgement.

iii) If insufficient progress has been made, the Student Teacher fails and their placement is terminated. Proceed to Stage 5.

The outcome of the Support and Intervention is recorded in the ‘Conclusion of process’ section of the Support and Intervention Agreement. A copy is returned to the University.

Stage 5: Next steps for unsuccessful Support and Intervention

The Student Teacher is informed of the termination of the placement and the reason, also of the capacity of the Examination Board to award the opportunity of a re-sit if it is judged to be appropriate. The student teacher may, additionally, be signposted to relevant university support systems if this is judged appropriate. This is recorded on the Support and Intervention Agreement within the section ‘Conclusion of process’. The final decision is confirmed to Student Teacher following the outcomes of the Examination Board.

It is important that if a Support and Intervention process has been instigated and has been successfully resolved, that the Student Teacher begins the next stage of professional with a “fresh start”.

What should Support and Intervention target setting involve?

  • Targets for improvement must be explicitly linked to areas of concern in the Student Teacher’s teaching which prevent the pupils from making the expected progress, and be referenced to the Teachers’ Standards and grade descriptors. The setting and revision of targets must be based on the review of the full range of evidence; there must be clear alignment between the identified issues and the targets set
  • Targets will require agreed actions for both the Student Teacher and all those working with him/her in the programme
  • Outcomes of the targets need to be specific, measurable and appropriate for the stage the student is at in their placement and on the course.

What types of action and evidence may be appropriate on a Support and Intervention Action Plan?

Actions and associated evidence should be specific and achievable in the short-term. Staff have found the following strategies helpful in supporting student teachers to gather evidence towards their targets, though the list is not exhaustive:

  • Directing the Student Teacher to specified Professional Learning Activities (PLAs) and discussing their responses;
  • Ensuring the Student Teacher receives consistent guidance about approaches to be taken - some Students Teachers have difficulty in choosing the best approaches from a number of options suggested;
  • Ensuring the teaching load is appropriate for the Student Teacher’s current situation;
  • Ensuring classes being taught are appropriate for the Student Teacher’s current situation;
  • Arranging for the Student Teacher to work alongside an experienced teacher in a support role - for example, leading specific sessions of the lesson in order to allow them to work to their strengths and hence develop successful practice;
  • Arranging for the Student Teacher to work with a teacher to provide support for specific pupils who will benefit from additional support or extension activities;
  • Providing extra support in developing the Student Teacher’s subject knowledge (possibly with additional advice from appropriate university staff);
  • Arranging for additional, focused observations of other teachers, perhaps outside as well as inside the Department (Secondary) or in other classes (Primary) in order to develop the Student Teacher’s understanding of good teaching in practice;

Providing evidence of action in response to constructive criticism e.g. through annotated lesson plans.

Documents

Partnership newsletters

  • 2017-18

Partnership development

  • Mentor development sessions