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Dr Tara Marshall

Dr Tara Marshall
Lecturer in Psychology

Summary

I received my BA in Psychology from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, in 1998. I then went on to complete my MA and PhD at the University of Toronto, where my dissertation research focused on cultural variation in romantic relationships. After graduating, I conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Tokyo and at the University of Western Ontario, where I further pursued my interests in cross-cultural psychology and in attachment styles in romantic relationships. I joined the Psychology Department at Brunel University London as a Lecturer in January 2009.

Qualifications:

  • PhD Psychology (University of Toronto)
  • MA Psychology (University of Toronto)
  • BA Psychology (Queen’s University)

Newest selected publications

Ferenczi, N., Marshall, TC. and Bejanyan, K. (2017) 'Are sex differences in antisocial and prosocial Facebook use explained by narcissism and relational self-construal?'. Computers in Human Behavior, 77. pp. 25 - 31. ISSN: 0747-5632 Open Access Link

Journal article

Lefringhausen, K. and Marshall, T. (2016) 'Locals’ Bidimensional Acculturation Model (LBAM): Validation and Associations with Psychological and Sociocultural Adjustment Outcomes'. Cross-Cultural Research: the journal of comparative social science, 50 (4). pp. 356 - 392. ISSN: 1069-3971 Open Access Link

Journal article

Whelan, J., Johnson, A., Marshall, T. and Thomson, M. (2016) 'Relational domain switching: Interpersonal insecurity predicts the strength and number of marketplace relationships'. Psychology & Marketing, 33 (6). pp. 465 - 479.Open Access Link

Journal article

Ferenczi, N., Marshall, T., Lefringhausen, K. and Bejanyan, K. (2016) 'Associations of insecure attachment with extreme pro-group actions: The mediating role of perceived marginalization'. Personality and Individual Differences, 91. pp. 84 - 88. ISSN: 1873-3549 Open Access Link

Journal article

Ferenczi, N. and Marshall, T. (2016) 'Meeting the expectations of your heritage culture: Links between attachment style, intragroup marginalisation, and psychological adjustment'. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. pp. 101 - 121. ISSN: 1460-3608 Open Access Link

Journal article
More publications(27)