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GAP WORK: Improving gender-related violence intervention and referral through youth practitioner training

Funding body

European Commission (DAPHNE III)

Investigator(s)

Principal investigator: Pam Alldred
Co-investigator: Dr Ian Rivers
Co-investigator: Dr Miriam David - Institute of Education, UCL
 

Project description

This 2013-2015 project tackled gender-related violence against (and by) children & young people by developing training for practitioners who have everyday contact with general populations of children and young people (such as teachers, youth workers, coaches etc.). The training improved practitioners’ confidence and ability to challenge sexist, sexualising, homophobic, normative or controlling language and behaviour, and to know when and how to refer children and young people to appropriate support services.

This 2013-2015 project tackled gender-related violence against (and by) children & young people by developing training for practitioners who have everyday contact with general populations of children and young people (such as teachers, youth workers, coaches etc.). The training improved practitioners’ confidence and ability to challenge sexist, sexualising, homophobic, normative or controlling language and behaviour, and to know when and how to refer children and young people to appropriate support services. This broad definition of gender-related violence problematized the violence of normativities, as well as material forms of violence, irrespective of who was targeted (Alldred 2016)

It bridged gaps between:

  • services for adults and children
  • victim-support services and everyday professional contact with children
  • supporting those affected and intervening in peer cultures to challenge violence
  • tackling domestic violence and abuse, and tackling homophobic behaviour and abuse.
  • It involved partners in Italy, Ireland, Spain and the UK, who in each country:
  1. Trained 800 practitioners
  2. Enabled them to train their colleagues
  3. Produced leaflets on GRV for youth practitioners
  4. Reported on practitioner training and its evaluation.

Central to the project was the idea of enabling trainees to feel confident in sharing their learning with colleagues and of seeking to mainstream such training in future professional training. It therefore created training resources for practitioners to use with colleagues (free to download from the project website) and lead to the training of whole departments of practitioners in some London Boroughs, as well as the use with groups of young people directly. Both the training models and resources and an initial evaluation of their implementation during the course of the project are published in Report 3 which is available in the six partner languages.

The project ran until February 2015, organising an international conference in late 2014 held at the Amnesty International London Offices and the presentations are available – as well as expert and user responses to the project – on the project website.

The team of 18 partners was coordinated by Dr Pam Alldred, in the Centre for Youth Work Studies at Brunel University. More information is available from the Brunel website or by emailing (pam.alldred@Brunel.ac.uk).