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Part-time Masters in MSc Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research

Susan Wagland

I would not be working at this level of seniority so soon without my Biomedical Sciences PhD.

Susan, Research

Biosciences PhD

From UK

Tell us about your career journey since you graduated?

I applied for jobs in clinical trials in order to combine my biomedical discipline of study with my previous experience as a Project Manager. I was fortunate to be offered a post as a Trial Manager and I have worked on three trials in Orthopaedic Trauma.

What does an average day at work involve for you?

Every day is different. I manage a team of Data Clerks and Trial Administrators, report to committees, present at conferences, ensure data quality is robust and that patients are treated with respect, and that the trials meet the requirements of the ethics committee that approved them.

What's been the highlight of your career so far?

I was very happy when my PATH-2 trial met its recruitment target. This represented a lot of hard work and meant we will have excellent data to publish.

How would you say Brunel helped you to get where you are today?

An MSc and PhD are not essential for clinical trials, but I would not be working at this level of seniority so soon without my PhD.

Why did you choose to study at Brunel and why would you recommend Brunel to others?

I chose Brunel because it was near enough to my home and offered a part-time Masters so I could look after my children. I would recommend Brunel to anyone for the enthusiasm and professionalism of the lecturers.

What is your best memory of studying here?

Completing a series of experiments and getting a good set of meaningful data.

If you could give one piece of advice to new students, what would that be?

For new PhD students: Do plenty of things not directly related to study. Go to conferences, attend journal club, and present posters and results. Also try to help in labs and offer help less experienced students.