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Environmental Pollution and Monitoring MSc

Subject area: Environmental Sciences Apply full-time (Sep)Apply full-time (Jan)Apply part-time (Sep)Apply part-time (Jan)
Mode of study

12 months full-time (September start); 15 months full-time (January start); 36 months part-time

PG Code

F753PENPOLM

Start date

January, September

Environmental Pollution and Monitoring MSc

Overview

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About the course

This postgraduate programme in Environmental Pollution and Monitoring (EPM) provides a rigorous academic treatment of the fundamental scientific principles and practice of assessing and controlling the extent of environmental damage by man’s activities.

The course emphasises the technology and principles behind the processes and techniques related to the reduction of emissions to air, land and water and the effects of pollution. It develops your understanding and critical awareness of:

  • The complex interactions of societies and their environments
  • How these interactions are unevenly experienced
  • The influence of human activities on ecological system including the relationship between hazard and risk.

You will be able to study the environmental and technological issues in the management and control of air, soil and water pollution. In addition, you will learn how to collect representative samples of air, soil and water for environmental monitoring. Hands on experience on the use of various analytical techniques and the use of various statistical analyses for data quality assessment (DQA) are also provided.

During your MSc you will be based in the Environmental Sciences group within the College of Health and Life Sciences, which is closely linked to one of Brunel’s flagship research institutes: the Institute of Environment, Health and Societies (IEHS). IEHS is a rapidly expanding research centre housing a strong team of leading experts held in high international regard in their respective fields. In 2011, our research revealing the link between chemicals in rivers and reproductive health won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education. Given this background, we are committed to research-led and innovative teaching.

This MSc is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM).

Scholarship schemes available for this MSc course

The Queen’s Anniversary Prize Scholarships

The Water Conservation Bursary

Aims

  • You will gain understanding of the fundamental scientific aspects of environmental pollution with an emphasis on sources, pathways and receptors and technical approaches to controlling exposure.
  • You will be able to understand the environmental and technological issues in the management and control of air, soil and water pollution.
  • You will learn the key analytical techniques and develop the practical skills in monitoring of environmental pollution.
  • You will study the practical methods for the investigation of air, soil and water quality.
  • The course places a lot of emphasis on individual student development but also involves team-working and presentations to develop your interpersonal skills.

Who is this course suitable for?

This MSc course is suitable for graduates or those with relevant experience who wish to develop a career in practical environmental monitoring and control for industry, consultancies and public bodies using applied environmental science.

This programme is designed to allow those whose career choice lies in fields such as environmental science, environmental management and regulatory processes, to acquire a broad based knowledge of the concepts involved. After completing this course you will be able to take up roles as environmental analysts and environmental mangers with an emphasis on environmental monitoring and pollution control.

Through the specialist modules in environmental impact and monitoring, with a focus on the technology used in the control and measurement of emissions and pollutants, training is given to students who wish to have a career as environmental practitioners.

About Environmental Sciences at Brunel

During your MSc you will be based in the Environmental Sciences group within the College of Health and Life Sciences, which is closely linked to one of Brunel’s flagship research institutes: the Institute of Environment, Health and Societies (IEHS). IEHS is a rapidly expanding research centre housing a strong team of leading experts held in high international regard in their respective fields. In 2011, our research revealing the link between chemicals in rivers and reproductive health won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education. Given this background, we are committed to research-led and innovative teaching.

Enquiries

College of Health and Life Sciences

Environmental Sciences
Brunel University London
Email abdul.chaudhary@brunel.ac.uk
Tel +44 (0)1895 266105

Course Director: Dr Abdul Chaudhary


Course Content

The programme is based around three compulsory modules that provide the essential background to pollution and monitoring. Students then chose three optional modules to focus their studies on their particular area of interest - e.g. energy, policy and law, environmental management, modelling and data analysis or environmental science. Indeed, our alumni have gone on to work in all these areas.

The programme can be taken full or part-time (from two days or one-day contact time per week, respectively, depending on the optional modules chosen) and has a start date in September or January.

Level 5

Compulsory

Environmental Monitoring

The module develops an understanding of the key aspects of sampling techniques in acquiring representative samples of air, soil and water for environmental monitoring. Students will be able to learn the key analytical techniques and develop the practical skills in monitoring of environmental pollution.

Students will be able to understand the importance of environmental monitoring programmes to control environmental pollution and the use of statistical methods to interpret analytical data into useful knowledge. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and written examination, and employs both group work and individual effort.

Integrated Pollution

This module studies and assesses fundamental scientific aspects of environmental pollution with an emphasis on sources, pathways and receptors and technical approaches to controlling exposure. Attention will be focussed to study the environmental and technological issues in the management and control of water, air and land pollution. Students will be able to critically evaluate and develop integrated approaches to environmental pollution control and also understand the national and international drivers that control air, land and water pollution.

Research and Critical Skills in Environmental Science

Careers in the environmental sector, be that public sector, private sector or academia, require a good grounding in research skills and how to critically appraise sources of information. This module uses research-led examples from the Institute of Environment, Health and Societies to develop these skills with both the dissertation and your career beyond Brunel in mind.

Dissertation

This is the culmination of your master's degree and allows development and expression of your abilities to a high level. The choice of topic is largely your own, and we encourage topics that will be of value to you when you leave the course. The dissertation is the last item of work you will submit, right at the end of your course, and is likely to be the most significant part of your MSc.

The aims and scope of the dissertation are determined in conjunction with a dissertation advisor. You are encouraged to begin planning your dissertation from the start of your master's course, but most of the work will be done after portion A and B are completed.

Optional

Students normally choose two modules from Group A and one module from Group B. (If desired, students are also able to choose one module from Group A and two modules from Group B or three modules from Group A and no modules from Group B - but must understand that this unbalances the two terms: 45:75 or 75:45 credits as opposed to 60:60.)

Group A (choose two from):

Environmental Hazards and Risk

Governments, industries and individuals need an understanding of scientific uncertainty and the relationship between hazard and risk in order to make informed decisions. This module investigates the theory and practice of hazard and risk, including: how risk is perceived and how risk is assessed in relation to natural, anthropogenic and occupational hazards in our environment. This knowledge is essential when developing mitigation or adaptation strategies relating to climate change or sustainability.

Environmental Management

The module develops an understanding of the key management principles and process necessary for successful implementation of sound environmental management practice. In detail it studies principal issues in environmental management of solid, liquid and gaseous materials, using appropriate case studies. The module incorporates relevant site visits and input from external experts.

Climate Change: Science and Impacts

Careers or research activity in the climate and sustainability fields require a good understanding of the climate system, specifically: why it undergoes changes; how we measure and assess those changes; how climate will change in the future; and what the impact of those changes is likely to be. In this module, we examine how humans have influenced the climate system and how the climate system has affected humanity. We investigate future climate projections to understand how Earth’s climate will change in the next few decades and out to 2100. Past climates are considered so that current and future changes can be contextualised.

Essentials in Ecotoxicology

This module utilises specific examples to illustrate terrestrial and aquatic ecotoxicology. It provides students with knowledge on how biological systems respond to and are affected by environmental contaminants, spanning different levels of organisation (individual, community and ecosystem). It also provides students with an understanding of the fate and behaviour of chemicals in the environment and the importance of these in determining health and environmental risk.

This module is currently delivered in the autumn term (12 weeks).

Chemical Regulation and Legislation in the EU

In a similar way to other modules, this continues to adopt the course perspective on specific cases that drive the learning. Accordingly, EU legislation is taught using specific chemicals as examples. These examples are used as drivers to explain the general features of relevant EU pieces of regulation, including Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), Water Framework Directive (WFD), Plant Protection Products Regulation (PPPR) and Biocidal Products Directive (BPD). The module also covers classification and labelling topics. A large number of the teaching sessions are in the form of seminars with expert guest speakers and structured debates.

This module is currently delivered in the Autumn term as a block module in five consecutive days.

Biosphere

This module explores the impact of human activities on our planet, especially the living component of our planet: the Biosphere. Humans are now the dominant species on the planet, and our activities are having far reaching consequences. Some of these global alterations made by humans may be approaching tipping points that some fear will destabilise whole Earth systems. This module uses Problem Based Learning to investigate the nine planetary boundaries outlined by Lynas is his landmark Nature paper from 2009 - "A Safe Operating Space for Humanity". These are: Biodiversity loss; Global Warming; Nitrogen Pollution; Land Use; Fresh Water Scarcity; Ocean Acidification; Ozone Depletion; Chemical Pollution; Atmospheric Aerosols.

Environmental Modelling

Modelling is consistently identified as a key skill required by employers in the environmental sector. This module aims to address this need by introducing students to the essential mathematical and computational concepts needed to understand how models of environmental processes work; and to develop the skills required to write, edit and apply a range of environmental models. These range from simple models of a single process through to off-the-shelf models that represent complex systems.

Sustainable Development in Practice

The key aim of this module is to develop the skills required to analyse, research and tackle real life sustainable development problems. This is achieved via a series of Problem-based Learning group projects that illustrate the complex interplay of environmental, societal and economic impacts and implications for a range of stakeholders. Students are also encouraged to develop skills of personal review and reflection and professional development.

Group B (choose one from):

Environment, Health and Societies

The impact on human health and societies is one of the key considerations when tackling environmental and sustainability issues. This module takes a seminar based approach to allow students to develop an understanding of the ways in which our environment affects human health and to explore public health interventions.

Current Practice in Chemical Risk Assessment

The module introduces the concepts and approaches that are currently used in human and ecological risk assessment. The emphasis is on case studies (e.g. from EU pesticide draft assessment reports), where data use and interpretation are practiced in a “hands-on” way. The module focuses on the identification of hazards on the basis of minimal data, fundamentals of exposure assessment (modelling approaches, monitoring and sampling, human biomonitoring), analysis and interpretation of toxicity data, particularly in terms of: data gaps, data quality, use of non-guideline test systems. Students will become familiar with the use of information systems and decision support instruments, such as ESIS, EUSES, IRIS, and of technical guidance documents and testing guidelines.

The module is currently delivered in the spring term as a block module in five modules.

Clean Technology

This module is designed to provide knowledge and understanding on how to develop clean technologies with an emphasis on those industrial and utility processes that enhance sustainable resource use and minimise pollution during resource extraction, processing and manufacture. Students will be able to understand the basic concepts, challenges and opportunities for the development of clean technologies relevant to various businesses, industries and other utility sectors. These include the textile, chemical, electrical, electronic, energy, water, waste, agriculture and construction industries.

Environmental Law

Students completing this module will study and assess the principles and structures underpinning environmental law in the European Union and internationally. Study focuses on:

1) key institutional systems relevant to the development of EU and international environmental law and policy

2) key decisions from international judicial bodies affecting the interpretation of EU and international environmental norms.

Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation

As society faces up to the reality of climate change, it is important to develop strategies that will allow developed and developing societies to:

a) reduce potential climate changes (i.e. mitigation)

b) cope with the inevitable changes (adaptation). These strategies are in the form of legislative, voluntary or market-led initiatives. This module is based around a series of student or external expert led seminars that examine a number of adaptation and mitigation strategies.

GIS and Data Analysis

Data visualisation and analysis are key skills required by the environmental sector. Students completing this module will develop an understanding of the technical and conceptual aspects of geographical information systems (GIS) and the methods required to extract insight from large datasets. Students will use the QGIS software to develop a critical and practical understanding of GIS. They will also apply data mining and machine learning techniques to large environmental datasets in order to extract useful findings from them.

View further details for each module.

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel and what you will learn on the course.

Special Features

  • The Environmental Pollution and Monitoring MSc is an interdisciplinary course informed by research from an award-winning Research Institute (The Institute of Environment, Health and Societies).
  • This is an IES and CIWEM accredited course.
  • You can attend full-time (two-days a week) or part- time (one day a week).
  • Brunel is a campus university with excellent facilities and close to London with great transport links.

Facts and Figures

About Environmental Sciences at Brunel

During your MSc you will be based in the Environmental Sciences group, which is closely linked to one of Brunel’s flagship research institutes: the Institute of Environment, Health and Societies (IEHS). IEHS is a rapidly expanding research centre housing a strong team of leading experts held in high international regard in their respective fields. In 2011, our research revealing the link between chemicals in rivers and reproductive health won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education. Given this background, we are committed to research-led and innovative teaching.

Employability

This MSc course is suitable for graduates or those with relevant experience who wish to develop a career in practical environmental monitoring and control for industry, consultancies and public bodies using applied environmental science.

It is designed to allow those whose career choice lies in fields such as environmental science, environmental management and regulatory processes, to acquire a broad based knowledge of the concepts involved.

After completing this course you will be able to take up roles as environmental analysts and environmental mangers with an emphasis on environmental monitoring and pollution control. Through the specialist modules in environmental impact and monitoring, with a focus on the technology used in the control and measurement of emissions and pollutants, training is given to students who wish to have a career as environmental practitioners.

At Brunel we provide many opportunities and experiences within your degree programme and beyond – work-based learning, professional support services, volunteering, mentoring, sports, arts, clubs, societies, and much, much more – and we encourage you to make the most of them, so that you can make the most of yourself.

» More about Employability

Fees for 2016/17 entry

UK/EU students: £7,300 full-time; £3,650 part-time

International students: £15,400 full-time; £7,700 part-time

Scholarship schemes available for this MSc course

The Queen’s Anniversary Prize Scholarships

The Water Conservation Bursary

UK/EU students can opt to pay in six equal monthly instalments: the first instalment is payable on enrolment and the remaining five by Direct Debit or credit/debit card.

Overseas students can opt to pay in two instalments: 60% on enrolment, and 40% in January for students who commence their course in September (or the remaining 40% in March for selected courses that start in January).

Fees quoted are per annum and are subject to an annual increase.

Entry Criteria 2016/17

Applicants will be admitted with a science-based degree with a minimum grade of a 2:2 (or equivalent) from a British University (or equivalent). A wide range of disciplines are acceptable, for example: Environmental Science; Engineering; Physics; Chemistry; Biology; Geography; Environmental Health; Marine Science; Maths; Agricultural Science; Law, Business and Economics.

Applicants with a third class honours degree or other qualifications will be considered if supported by science A-level (or equivalent) and relevant work experience. Such applicants may be required to attend an interview.

Entry criteria are subject to review and change each academic year.


International and EU Entry Requirements

If your country or institution is not listed or if you are not sure whether your institution is eligible, please contact Admissions

This information is for guidance only by Brunel University London and by meeting the academic requirements does not guarantee entry for our courses as applications are assessed on case-by-case basis.

English Language Requirements

  • IELTS: 6.5 (min 6 in all areas)
  • Pearson: 58 (51 in all subscores)
  • BrunELT: 65% (min 60% in all areas)

Brunel University London strongly recommends that if you will require a Tier 4 visa, you sit your IELTS test at a test centre that has been approved by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) as being a provider of a Secure English Language Test (SELT). Not all test centres have this status. The University can accept IELTS (with the required scores) taken at any official test centre or other English Language qualifications we accept as meeting our main award entry requirements.

However, if you wish to undertake a Pre-sessional English course to further improve your English prior to the start of your degree course, you must sit the test at an approved SELT provider. This is because you will only be able to apply for a Tier 4 student visa to undertake a Pre-sessional English course if you hold a SELT from a UKVI approved test centre. Find out more information about it.

Brunel also offers our own BrunELT English Test and accepts a range of other language courses. We also have Pre-sessional English language courses for students who do not meet these requirements, or who wish to improve their English.

Our International Pathways and Language Centre offers a number of foundation and pre-masters courses to provide you with the academic skills required for your chosen course.