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Understanding privacy and trust dichotomy

This is an EPSRC Sandpit project in collaboration with University of Kent, Royal Holloway University of London and Edinburgh Napier University to explore the dichotomy between trust and privacy and perceive the variation of these notions across cultures in the cyber space.

Users of social networks often end up sharing significant amount of personal information (like phone numbers) to gain trust. On fora like online dating where trust has to be earned, the price paid is often by giving up privacy. The project will run series of online design workshops to explore the understandings of privacy trade off people consciously or subconsciously do to gain trust across cultures.

We identify this dichotomy between trust and privacy and perceive the variation of these notions across cultures in the cyber space.

Our overall goal is two-fold:

  1. evaluate the cultural differences in information sharing practices (privacy-trust dichotomy) used to form trusted digital relationships, and
  2. evaluate how visualisations of trust differ across cultures. We will design, organise and conduct two workshops to collect data for our analysis.

The goal of these workshops will be to quantify trust and privacy notions based on certain metrics.


Meet the Principal Investigator(s) for the project


Related Research Group(s)

Inclusive Design

Inclusive Design - Inclusive Design Research Group at Brunel University London brings together multidisciplinary expertise to understand different factors causing exclusion, to develop methods and interventions for improvement, and to advance the knowledge of design for inclusion.


Project last modified 15/07/2021