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Anthropology and Sociology BSc

Course code

LL6H, LL64

LL63 with professional development

Start date

September

Placement available

Mode of study

3 years full-time

4 years full-time with placement

4 years full-time with placement

Fees

2020/21

UK / EU £9,250

International £14,325

Entry requirements

BBB (A-level)

DDM (BTEC)

30 (IB)

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Overview

Take your knowledge of culture and society to the next level and equip yourself with a big range of practical and analytical skills for a changing world with our Anthropology and Sociology BSc.

Anthropology is concerned with contemporary issues such as multiculturalism, identity politics, racism and ethnic nationalism, changing forms of the family, religious conflict, gender, and the political role of culture. It also addresses fundamental questions about human nature, such as: ‘What do we have in common with each other cross-culturally?’ and ‘What makes us different?’

Sociology, its sister subject, looks at the foundations of social life and the big issues in contemporary society such as inequality, racism, globalisation, and migration.

In particular, your sociology studies at Brunel will be closely related to the central and ever-increasing importance of the communications media in our culture, for example, how poverty is portrayed and the powerful influence of celebrity.

Brunel is a great choice for this combined study with lecturers from both subjects producing cutting edge research alongside their teaching, on both global issues and local problems.

This research expertise filters down into what you will learn. In anthropology students have learnt about youth and motorcycles in Rwanda, and in sociology, about cosmetic tourism.

Choose this course and you can do fieldwork on any subject, anywhere in the world, whether it’s learning about refugees in Athens or mother and toddler groups in inner London.

Around half of Brunel anthropology students carry out a placement or fieldwork abroad, in places as wide ranging as India, Nepal, Australia, South Africa, Papua New Guinea and Jamaica.

Recent UK placement destinations include the Royal Anthropological Institute, Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom, Amnesty International and the Department of Health.

Alternatively, could choose a placement that’s more sociologically focussed. Either way, you can choose to take it as two six month placements or one year-long placement.

You can explore our campus and facilities for yourself by taking our virtual tour.

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Course content

Your first year will be an introduction to academic studies in social science, including an introduction to key theoretical issues as well as practical training in research methods, such as interviewing and participant observation.

In your second year, anthropology modules cover the history and theory of anthropology, and current issues in the fields of ethnicity, gender, religion and kinship. Sociology topics include sociological theory, methods and contemporary social institutions.

In your final year, you can choose your own modules from a wide range of advanced options from both disciplines, alongside your own dissertation research project.

Optional modules are indicative and available subject to numbers.

This course can be studied 3 years full-time, 4 years full-time with placement or 4 years full-time with placement, starting in September.

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

This course has a professional development option. Find out more about work placements available.

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Careers and your future

As a graduate of a three year anthropology and sociology degree, your research and fieldwork experience, which forms such a major part of our degree course, will help to set you apart from other graduates. 

These placements build up fantastic experience and can connect you with organisations and people who will be invaluable when it comes to progressing your career.

Brunel graduates have gone on to work at the World Bank, UNICEF, the NHS, NGOs and charities such as Oxfam and Save the Children, as well as local government, legal sectors and the media. 

Graduates have also gone on to work as teachers, journalists and research officers in the health and social sectors, and in other professions requiring knowledge of social and cultural processes.

Others go on to pursue further research degrees in anthropology and become academic anthropologists.

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UK entry requirements

  • GCE A-level BBB (all subjects considered).
  • BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma DDM in a related subject.
  • BTEC Level 3 Diploma DD in a related subject with an A-Level at grade B.
  • BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma D in any subject with A-Levels grade BB.
  • International Baccalaureate Diploma 30 points.
  • Access to Higher Education Diploma Complete and pass a related subject Access course with 45 credits at Level 3, of which 30 credits must be at Distinction and 15 credits at Merit or higher.

A minimum of five GCSEs are required, including GCSE English Language grade C or grade 4. GCSE Mathematics grade C or grade 4 is also normally required. 

Please check our Admissions pages for more information on other factors we use to assess applicants as well as our full GCSE requirements and accepted equivalencies in place of GCSEs.

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EU and International entry requirements

If you require a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK, you must prove knowledge of the English language so that we can issue you a Certificate of Acceptance for Study (CAS). To do this, you will need an IELTS for UKVI or Trinity SELT test pass gained from a test centre approved by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and on the Secure English Language Testing (SELT) list. This must have been taken and passed within two years from the date the CAS is made.

English language requirements

  • IELTS: 6.5 (min 5.5 in all areas)
  • Pearson: 58 (51 in all subscores)
  • BrunELT: 65% (min 55% in all areas)

You can find out more about the qualifications we accept on our English Language Requirements page.

Should you wish to take a pre-sessional English course to improve your English prior to starting your degree course, you must sit the test at an approved SELT provider for the same reason. We offer our own BrunELT English test and have pre-sessional English language courses for students who do not meet requirements or who wish to improve their English. You can find out more information on English courses and test options through our Brunel Language Centre.

Please check our Admissions pages for more information on other factors we use to assess applicants. This information is for guidance only and each application is assessed on a case-by-case basis. Entry requirements are subject to review, and may change.

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Fees and funding

2020/21

UK / EU

£9,250 full-time

£1,000 placement year

International

£14,325 full-time

£1,000 placement year

Fees quoted are per year and may be subject to an annual increase. Home/EU undergraduate student fees are regulated and are currently capped at £9,250 per year; any changes will be subject to changes in government policy. International fees will increase annually, by no more than 5% or RPI (Retail Price Index), whichever is the greater.

More information on any additional course-related costs.

See our fees and funding page for full details of undergraduate scholarships available to Brunel applicants.

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Teaching and Learning

You will be taught by an internationally respected team of sociologists and anthropologists who have conducted research and fieldwork across the globe, on topics like religion, identity, witchcraft, disability, memory, nationalism, political violence, social hierarchies, race, ethnicity, and ecology.

Like most social science subjects, the course is taught through a mixture of lectures and small discussion groups or seminars. For each module, you will usually attend one lecture and one seminar every week.

Uniquely for a UK university, studying anthropology at Brunel will always mean applying what you have read to what you discover in real-life situations with the opportunity to conduct fieldwork experience anywhere in the world.

Should you need any non-academic support during your time at Brunel, the Student Support and Welfare Team are here to help.

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Assessment and feedback

Assessment is typically by essay or practical assignments (for example, analysis of a short field exercise), and a dissertation of approximately 10,000 to 15,000 words based upon your own fieldwork experience anywhere in the world.

Read our guide on how to avoid plagiarism in your assessments at Brunel.