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Funded Research degree opportunities

We currently have the following funded Research degree opportunities available. 

PhD Studentship in Breast Cancer Biology

The College of Health and Life Sciences at Brunel University London is offering a fully funded PhD Studentship supported by Breast Cancer Hope. The studentship is open to UK/EU residents and includes tuition fees and a tax-free stipend (£16,553 per year) for three years starting 1 October 2017.

In collaboration with Professor Kefah Mokbel from the London Breast Institute, the student will investigate whether expression of ACBD3, a 1q gene, alters breast cancer cell behaviours to a more aggresive phenotype and determine whether inhibition of function could have therapeutic potential.

Find out more

Project details
1q amplification occurs in 50-60% of breast cancers and is arguably the largest and most common genomic change in this disease. The main goal of this project is to understand the role of a 1q gene in breast cancer biology. Specifically the student will determine whether:

  • ACBD3 is over-expressed (at RNA and protein level) in breast cancers, and whether any over-expression is correlated to a specific tumour sub type
  • ACBD3 expression links to patient outcomes
  • over-expression of ACBD3 promotes the ‘tumour-like’ behaviour in breast cancer cells
  • over-expression of ACBD3 disrupts the formation of acini in 3D culture
  • inhibition of ACBD3 decreases ‘tumour-like’ behaviour in breast cancer

Informal enquires may be addressed to Dr Amanda Harvey, amanda.harvey@brunel.ac.uk

Eligibility
This project is ideally suited to a student with a minimum of a 2:1 Honors degree in biology, biochemistry, biotechnology or similar disciplines. A masters qualification in cellular and/or molecular biology is highly desirable. Hands on experience in mammalian cell culturing is essential, and experience in molecular cloning, gene targeting, protein and nucleic acid analysis would be advantageous.

How to apply
If you wish to apply, please e-mail the following to chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk by 21 July 2017.

  • An up-to-date CV;
  • A single-page A4 single-spaced covering letter setting out why you are a suitable candidate. Please state the name of the project at the top of the page;
  • Names and contact details for two referees;
  • A copy of your highest degree certificate and transcript;
  • A copy of your English language qualification (where applicable).

Short-listed applicants will be required to attend an interview. Applicants chosen for interview will be instructed to submit a formal online application via Admissions.

For further information about how to apply please contact the College of Health and Life Sciences Postgraduate Research Student Office on chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk.

 

PhD Studentship in Use of Liquid Biopsies as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers for Lung Cancer

The College of Health and Life Sciences at Brunel University London is offering a PHE fully funded PhD studentship for three years, in collaboration with Mount Vernon Cancer Centre. This studentship covers a generous tax-free stipend of £16,553 and full UK/EU tuition and bench fees. Based at Brunel, the project will start on 1 October 2017 and the student will be supervised by Dr Emmanouil Karteris and Dr Uday Kishore (Brunel University London) and liaising with Dr Andy Polychronis (Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, UK).

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Project details
Lung cancer is still one of the biggest killers in the western world today, with incidence rises exponentially. The ability to diagnose lung cancer at an early stage, could increase the currently poor survival rates, with 5 year survival as low as 10%. Blood based biomarkers, referred to as ‘liquid biopsies’ are becoming an increasingly popular area of research in cancer, due to its non-invasive nature, real time and routine sampling capabilities, compared to conventional biopsies. Circulating free tumour DNA (ctDNA) is tumour derived fragmented DNA, that is known to originate directly from the cancer itself. The exact nature of how the ctDNA is shed is unknown, but postulated to occur due to apoptosis and necrosis of cancer cells and active release from viable tumour cells. Moreover, Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are cancer cells shown to be present in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. These cells shed from the tumour and express tumour-specific characteristics. The passage and adherence of CTCs in peripheral blood is key to the genesis of distant metastases in various cancers and hence crucial to patient outcomes. Emerging evidence supports the clinical utility of CTCs, and there is increasing evidence that CTCs can be used as predictive markers for diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. The overall aim of the study will be to use these liquid biopsies as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for lung cancer. More specifically we seek to:

  1. Validate qPCR test for EGFR and KRAS mutations in patients with Non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).
  2. Quantify ctDNA in case-control studies.
  3. Use imaging flow cytometry to characterise CTCs from NSCLC patients.
  4. Identify key genes involved in lung cancer signalling and elucidate further their role using a number of lung cancer cell lines as in vitro models on a 3D bioscaffold (hydrogel).

The student will be trained in multidisciplinary techniques including 3D cell culture, isolation and characterisation of circulating tumour cells, analysis of ctDNA rom clinical samples, and will develop a valuable set of technical and theoretical expertise that will boost a successful career as an independent scientist in the future.

Eligibility
Candidates are required to be UK-based and must ensure they fully meet the eligibility criteria of Brunel. We are looking for an enthusiastic and high-calibre candidate with an interest in lung cancer, 3D tissue culture and circulating tumour cells. The project would be ideally suited to a student with a minimum of a 2:1 Honours degree in biological sciences, biomedical sciences, or similar disciplines. Previous experience in this field is highly desirable. Applicants who have not been awarded a degree by a university in the UK will be expected to demonstrate English language skills to IELTS 7.0 (minimum 6.0 in any section).

How to apply
Informal enquiries are most welcome and should be sent to Dr Emmanouil Karteris Emmanouil.Karteris@brunel.ac.uk.

If you wish to apply, please e-mail the following to chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk by 24 July 2017

  • An up-to-date CV;
  • A single-page A4 single-spaced covering letter setting out why you are a suitable candidate;
  • Names and contact details for two referees;
  • A copy of your highest degree certificate and transcript;
  • A copy of your English language qualification (where applicable).

Short-listed applicants will be required to attend an interview. It is likely that interviews will take place on Tuesday 29 August 2017 (to be confirmed).

For further information about how to apply please contact the College of Health and Life Sciences Postgraduate Research Student Office at chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk

 

PhD Studentship in Assessment of Risks from Combined Exposures to Radiation and Chemicals

The College of Health and Life Sciences at Brunel University London is offering a PhD studentship, full funded by CHRC for three years. This studentship covers a generous tax-free stipend of £16,553 and full UK/EU tuition fees. Based at Brunel, the project will start on 1 October 2017 and will be supervised by Professor Andreas Kortenkamp and Dr Rhona Anderson.

Project overview
The studentship is offered in the Environment and Health theme and will be joining a new team setting up the Centre for Health Effects of Radiological and Chemical Agents (CHRC). The aim is to explore the health impact of radiological and chemical agents on military personnel and their families.

Find out more

Project details
Funded by the Nuclear Community Charity Fund, CHRC will initially be devoted to support the needs of the aged nuclear community and their families by exploring the health impact of participation at the nuclear weapons test sites in the 1950s and 1960s. CHRC will involve a multi-disciplinary team of social scientists, biologists and toxicologists and will carry out research for translation into evidence-based advice, education and support for potentially affected communities.

Very little is known about combined genotoxic effects of different types of ionising radiation and chemical carcinogens. However, there is the possibility that radiation might lead to heightened sensitivity to chemical carcinogens, or that pre-existing chemical exposures might increase the sensitivity to radiation. There is evidence from studies of radon cancer risks among smokers that radiation and chemical exposures combined lead to increased cancer risks, but more systematic studies are needed to elucidate the magnitude of combined effects and to better define the joint risks.

This studentship will conduct proof of concept experiments with cultured cells which will reveal whether combined genotoxic effects between radiation and chemical exposures can occur in principle. This approach will enable us to establish basic cell biological principles which will provide a solid foundation for examining whether combined risks exist under more realistic exposure scenarios. We will exploit a predictive approach which we have established in mixture experiments with genotoxic chemicals. This approach requires that the mixture components (chemicals and radiation) as well as the mixture itself are evaluated in relation to a common adverse outcome (e.g. micronuclei, chromosome translocations) to enable detailed dose-response analyses. These studies will put the assessment of the risks from combined exposures to radiation and chemicals on a sound footing and will set the scene for evaluations of realistic exposures.

The student will be trained in cell culture techniques, cytogenetics, dosimetry and experimental approaches to evaluating mixture effects and will develop a valuable set of technical and theoretical expertise that will boost a successful career as an independent scientist.

Eligibility
Candidates are required to be UK-based and must ensure they fully meet the eligibility criteria of Brunel. We are looking for an enthusiastic and high-calibre candidate with an interest in radiation health effects and the combined effects of chemical exposures. The project would be ideally suited to a student with a minimum of a 2:1 Honours degree in the life sciences, or similar disciplines. Master qualification in the life sciences correlated disciplines is highly desirable. If you are a non-native speaker and have not been awarded a degree by a University in the UK, you must demonstrate English language skills to IELTS 7.0 (minimum 6.0 in any section).

How to apply
Informal enquiries are most welcome and should be sent to Professor Andreas Kortenkamp, 
Andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk. If you wish to apply, please e-mail the following to chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk
by 30 July 2017

  • An up-to-date CV;
  • A single-page A4 single-spaced covering letter setting out why you are a suitable candidate;
  • Names and contact details for two referees;
  • A copy of your highest degree certificate and transcript;
  • A copy of your English language qualification (where applicable).

Short-listed applicants will be required to attend an interview. Applicants chosen for interview will be instructed to submit a formal online application via Admissions.

For further information about how to apply please contact the College of Health and Life Sciences Postgraduate Research Student Office at chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk

 

PhD Studentship: Clinical Correlates of Chromosomal Abnormalities

The College of Health and Life Sciences at Brunel University London is offering a three-year PhD studentship, fully funded by CHRC. The studentship covers a generous tax-free stipend of £17,305 and full UK/EU tuition fees. Based at Brunel, the project will start on 1 October 2017 and will be supervised by Dr Rhona Anderson.

Project overview
The studentship is offered in the Environment and Health theme and will be joining a new team setting up the Centre for Health Effects of Radiological and Chemical Agents (CHRC). The aim is to explore the health impact of radiological and chemical agents on military personnel and their families. 

Find out more

Project details
Funded by the Nuclear Community Charity Fund, CHRC will initially be devoted to support the needs of the aged nuclear community and their families by exploring the health impact of participation at the nuclear weapons test sites in the 1950s and 1960s. CHRC will involve a multi-disciplinary team of social scientists, biologists and toxicologists and will carry out research for translation into evidence-based advice, education and support for potentially affected communities.

The heritable effects of parental radiation exposure pre-conception remain to be fully understood. The most comprehensive studies thus far undertaken involve offspring of Japanese A-bomb survivors who were conceived after their parents were exposed show little evidence of inherited adverse effects due to parental irradiation, however, an increase in birth defects and, a small transient increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia after the 1960s peak of global nuclear testing, have been reported.

Cytogenetic analysis is used to routinely determine an individual’s constitution whereby an individual is determined to be karyotypically normal or abnormal. Cytogenetics is also informative for the identification of acquired clonal changes and/or the accumulation of newly arising (non-clonal/sub-clonal) genetic alterations which may arise through genomic instability mechanisms. This Doctoral study will analyse cells sampled from descendants of British nuclear test veterans to determine if there is any evidence of cytogenetic abnormalities present in this population. All findings will be correlated with known clinical effects and/or assessment of risk of clinical effect.

The student will be trained in cell culture techniques, cytogenetics, microscopy and experimental approaches to evaluate findings within a clinical context. They will develop a valuable set of technical and theoretical expertise that will boost a successful career as an independent scientist. 

Eligibility
Candidates are required to be UK-based and must ensure they fully meet the eligibility criteria of Brunel. We are looking for an enthusiastic and high-calibre candidate with an interest in radiation health effects and the combined effects of chemical exposures. The project would be ideally suited to a student with a minimum of a 2:1 Honours degree in the life sciences, or similar disciplines. Master qualification in the life sciences correlated disciplines is highly desirable. If you are a non-native speaker and have not been awarded a degree by a University in the UK, you must demonstrate English language skills to IELTS 7.0 (minimum 6.0 in any section).

How to apply
Informal enquiries are most welcome and should be sent to Dr Rhona Anderson, rhona.anderson@brunel.ac.uk.
If you wish to apply, please e-mail the following to chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk by 30 July 2017

  • An up-to-date CV;
  • A single-page A4 single-spaced covering letter setting out why you are a suitable candidate;
  • Names and contact details for two referees;
  • A copy of your highest degree certificate and transcript;
  • A copy of your English language qualification (where applicable).

Short-listed applicants will be required to attend an interview. Applicants chosen for interview will be instructed to submit a formal online application via Admissions.

For further information about how to apply please contact the College of Health and Life Sciences Postgraduate Research Student Office at chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk

 

PhD Studentship in Exposure Worry, Ageing and Cognitive Functioning: An In-Depth Study of British Nuclear Test Veterans

The College of Health and Life Sciences at Brunel University London is offering a three-year PhD studentship, fully funded by CHRC. The studentship covers a generous tax-free stipend of £16,553 and full UK/EU tuition fees. Based at Brunel, the project will start 1 October 2017 and will be supervised by Professor Mary Gilhooly and Dr Will Young.

Project overview
The studentship is offered in the Social Sciences, to join a new team setting up the Centre for Health Effects of Radiological and CHemical Agents (CHRC). The aim is to explore the health impact of radiological and chemical agents on military personnel and their families.

Find out more

Project details
Funded by the Nuclear Community Charity Fund, CHRC will initially be devoted to support the needs of the aged nuclear community and their families by exploring the health impact of participation at the nuclear weapons test sites in the 1950s and 1960s. CHRC will involve a multi-disciplinary team of social scientists, biologists and toxicologists and will carry out research for translation into evidence-based advice, education and support for potentially affected communities. 

Recent studies demonstrate a potential link between exposure to ionising radiation with premature cellular ageing and also chronic inflammatory responses and as a consequence, to age-related diseases including those which impact on cognitive function. Additionally, any potential impact of exposure to a nuclear test event on cognitive functioning in old age, years of worry about the potential damage to oneself, and potential genetic damage to one’s children, could itself impact on cognitive functioning. It is well established that stress and long-term anxiety have a negative impact on cognitive functioning. The aim of this study is to examine factors associated with an important aspect of healthy ageing and quality of life, namely cognitive functioning. A special feature of this study is an examination of ‘exposure worry’ and cognitive functioning. Currently there is no such research on cognitive effects of witnessing nuclear tests among UK or other national groups of test veterans. However this aspect is being explored with increasing priority in relation to populations affected by the Chernobyl and Fukishima accidents.

The student will be trained in techniques of cognitive testing, interviewing and survey methods, developing over the project a valuable set of  statistical, technical and theoretical expertise that will boost a successful career as an independent scientist. 

Eligibility
Candidates are required to be UK-based and must ensure they fully meet the eligibility criteria of Brunel. We are looking for an enthusiastic and high-calibre candidate with an interest in radiation health effects, cognitive functioning and ageing. The project would be ideally suited to a student with a minimum of a 2:1 Honours degree in psychology, or similar discipline. An  MSc in psychology, public health, gerontology, or a related discipline is highly desirable. The project would be of particular interest to those wishing to pursue a career in health psychology or clinical psychology.  If you are a non-native speaker and have not been awarded a degree by a University in the UK, you must demonstrate English language skills to IELTS 7.0 (minimum 6.0 in any section).

How to apply
Informal enquiries are most welcome and should be sent to Professor Mary Gilhooly, mary.gilhooly@brunel.ac.uk. 
If you wish to apply, please e-mail the following to chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk by 30 July 2017

  • An up-to-date CV;
  • A single-page A4 single-spaced covering letter setting out why you are a suitable candidate;
  • Names and contact details for two referees;
  • A copy of your highest degree certificate and transcript;
  • A copy of your English language qualification (where applicable).

Short-listed applicants will be required to attend an interview. Applicants chosen for interview will be instructed to submit a formal online application via Admissions.

For further information about how to apply please contact the College of Health and Life Sciences Postgraduate Research Student Office at chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk

 

PhD Studentship in Sport, Culture and Wellbeing: Developing Interventions to Promote Wellbeing Among British Nuclear Test Veterans and Families

The Division of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences within the College of Health and Life Sciences at Brunel University London is offering a three year PhD studentship. The studentship is fully funded by CHRC and covers a generous tax-free stipend of £16,553 and full UK/EU tuition fees. Based at Brunel, the project will start 1 October 2017 and will be supervised by Dr Louise Mansfield and Professor Tessa Kay.

Project overview
The studentship is offered in the Social Sciences, to join a new team setting up the Centre for Health Effects of Radiological and CHemical Agents (CHRC). The aim is to explore the health impact of radiological and chemical agents on military personnel and their families.

Find out more

Project details
Funded by the Nuclear Community Charity Fund, CHRC will support the needs of the aged nuclear community and their families by exploring the health impact of participation at the nuclear weapons test sites in the 1950s and 1960s.Staff in the Division of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences are delighted to be part of the Centre’s multi-disciplinary team of social scientists, biologists and toxicologists who will carry out research for translation into evidence-based advice, education and support for potentially affected communities. 

The Sport, culture and wellbeing doctoral study will develop and assess sport and culture interventions to promote wellbeing among members of the British nuclear test veteran community. Research will be undertaken with veterans and their families to increase knowledge and understanding of the impacts of exposure worry on members of the community, and to develop supportive interventions to address these. The studentship study will move beyond previous research into the impacts on this population, to develop and evaluate wellbeing interventions that address them. 

The project will especially draw on Brunel’s expertise in assessing the use of cultural activities and sport and exercise to promote wellbeing, developed through the UK-wide ESRC-funded ‘What Works Wellbeing’ project. Cultural activities and sport, exercise and physical activity can be developed in diverse forms and can support community-based and individually focused interventions. 

The student will benefit from Brunel’s extensive programme of postgraduate training, including its recently accredited provision as a partner in the ESRC-funded Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership. These provide opportunities to develop a valuable set research skills and expertise that will boost a successful career as an independent scientist. 

Eligibility
Candidates are required to be UK-based and must ensure they fully meet the eligibility criteria of Brunel. We are looking for an enthusiastic and high-calibre candidate with an appropriate background in social science at UG level and enthusiasm to apply their knowledge to address health and wellbeing in the British Nuclear Test Community.. The project would be ideally suited to a student with a minimum of a 2:1 Honours degree in sport or public health or similar disciplines. A masters qualification in a related discipline is highly desirable. If you are a non-native speaker and have not been awarded a degree by a University in the UK, you must demonstrate English language skills to IELTS 7.0 (minimum 6.0 in any section).

How to apply
Informal enquiries are most welcome and should be sent to Dr Louise Mansfield, louise.mansfield@brunel.ac.uk. 
If you wish to apply, please e-mail the following to chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk by 30 July 2017

  • An up-to-date CV;
  • A single-page A4 single-spaced covering letter setting out why you are a suitable candidate;
  • Names and contact details for two referees;
  • A copy of your highest degree certificate and transcript;
  • A copy of your English language qualification (where applicable).

Short-listed applicants will be required to attend an interview. Applicants chosen for interview will be instructed to submit a formal online application via Admissions.

For further information about how to apply please contact the College of Health and Life Sciences Postgraduate Research Student Office at chls-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk

 

PhD Studentship in Innovative techniques for precise, atraumatic      placement of cochlear implant

Brunel Institute for Bioengineering is offering a full time studentship funded by Action on Hearing Loss, the largest UK charity helping people confronting deafness, tinnitus and hearing loss to live the life they choose. It will be supervised jointly by an internationally leading team of engineering and clinical professionals. 

The PhD studentship is available for both Home/EU students and International students for a period of three years, effective
1 October 2017. The successful applicant will receive an annual stipend (bursary) of approximately £17,000 plus payment of full time Home/EU tuition fees (£4,195 for 2017/18 entry).

Find out more

Project Details
Cochlear implants (CIs) have shown considerable patient benefit in terms of understanding speech in severely and profoundly hearing-impaired adults and children. Trauma induced during implantation is of great concern as the intention is to preserve patient residual hearing. Naturally the hearing organ is sensitive to physical disturbance, and intervention during CI currently leads to disturbance induced by preparing a mastoidectomy, cochleostomy and through placement of the electrode within the cochlea. Precise and atraumatic placement of the electrode array with respect to the tissues of the cochlea will lead to more consistent results and predictable outcome for patients.  This research is dedicated to investigate innovative technology to achieve this aim working from a significant background of successful work investigating atraumatic implantation in otology.

The aim of this project is to investigate new approaches in technology to produce an innovative integrated, automatic CI electrode array feed tool for demonstration in laboratory phantoms. The tool will minimise the level of trauma induced and increase the precision to which the electrode is fully placed within the cochlea. To achieve this, the research will investigate and integrate:

  • A novel sensing scheme using CI electrodes for automatic perception and discrimination  of the electrode array behaviour during placement to avoid damage to inner cochlear membrane structures.
  • A novel micro-actuation approach for automated insertion of the array based on pulling as opposed to pushing that will achieve precise displacement on required axes without errors induced by electrode flexure.
  • An automated strategy for electrode motion during placement to minimise the amplitude of intra-cochlear pressure transients and tissue interaction. Automation is a requirement as in this microsurgical, minimally invasive process precise actuation and perception is beyond the capability of human operators.

Eligibility
Applicants will have or be expected to receive a minimum 2:1 or 1st class degree in engineering (mechanical or electrical) or physical science, and have good communication skills written and spoken English language. An understanding of programming languages such as C language, and programming in MATLAB, mechanical or electronic s design will be an advantage. A masters qualification is an advantage but not essential. 

Informal enquires may be addressed to may be made via email to Dr Xinli Du and/or and Dr Nikolaos Boulgouris via email xinli.du@brunel.ac.uk / nikolaos.boulgouris@brunel.ac.uk

If you wish to apply
Please e-mail your application comprising of all the documents listed below to 
cedps-pgr-office@brunel.ac.uk by Noon on 31 July 2017:

  • Your up-to-date CV;
  • A one A4 page personal statement setting out why you are a suitable candidate (i.e.: your skills and experience);
  • A copy of your degree certificate(s) and transcript (s);
  • Names and contact details for two academic referees;
  • Evidence of English language capability to IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all sections), if applicable

Interviews will take place during August 2017.  

 

PhD Studentships in Electronic and Computer Engineering, Experimental Particle Physics

The College of Engineering, Design and Physical Sciences at Brunel University London is offering two funded PhD studentships within the Particle Physics Group, UK funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC)

  • One successful applicant will work on the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva

  • One successful applicant will work on the MICE experiment based at STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire

Both PhD studentships are for a period of up to four years commencing on or before October 2017 and will include, for CMS, the possibility of a long-term attachment at CERN for a year or longer. The successful applicants will receive an annual stipend (bursary) of £16,553 plus payment of their full time Home-EU tuition fees.

Find out more

Project details
The Particle Physics Group has been carrying out research in experimental particle physics for more than 25 years, with its current focus being the CMS experiment at CERN, the MICE experiment at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, and Grid computing for particle physics (GridPP project).

Our CMS group makes a significant contribution to the study of top quark production in proton-proton collisions using CMS data. The group also plays an active role in the maintenance, operation and upgrading of the Silicon Tracker, having contributed to the construction and commissioning of this detector and the current endcap electromagnetic calorimeter. We are looking to recruit a student to study the production of the top quark in both Standard Model and Beyond the Standard Model scenarios using CMS data and to contribute to activities related to the upgrade of the current CMS tracking detector. Successful applicants will also contribute to detector performance studies. A period of long-term attachment at CERN is associated with the CMS studentship.

The MICE collaboration aims to demonstrate the ionisation cooling principle for a muon beam by making one of the most precise measurements of emittance and its reduction through ionisation cooling. The successful candidate will take a leading role in the analysis of data taken in 2016 and 2017. The student will contribute to the precision measurement of beam emittance and emittance reduction across the MICE absorbers. Our aim is to make the most precise measurement of beam emittance ever. This is an exciting opportunity for a PhD student who will be based jointly at Brunel University London and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

Eligibility
Applicants will have or be expected to receive a good undergraduate degree (upper second or first BSc) but ideally an MSci/MPhys degree, in Physics or a closely related subject, to be eligible for STFC studentships. Experience of C++ or python would be an advantage, and additionally for the MICE studentship a knowledge and interest in particle accelerators and beam dynamics. The studentships also have eligibility criteria relating to UK residency, for full details of the STFC eligibility criteria and other information, please visit the STFC studentship website.

How to apply
If you wish to apply, please e-mail the following to Group Leader, Professor Peter Hobson (Peter.Hobson@brunel.ac.uk) as soon as possible: 

  • An up-to-date CV;
  • A single-page A4 personal statement setting out why you are a suitable candidate (i.e. outlining your qualifications and skills);
  • Names and contact details for two academic referees;
  • A copy of your degree certificate(s) and transcript(s);
  • Evidence of English language capability to IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all sections), if applicable

 Applications will continue to be accepted until all studentships have been filled.