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Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology MSc

Course code

L610PPSYPSYA

Start date

September

Subject area

Anthropology

Mode of study

1 year full-time

2 or 2.5 years part-time

Fees

2019/20

UK / EU £8,000

International £15,400

Entry requirements

2:2

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Overview

If studies of the mind and mental health interest you, this socially and culturally focused course may provide a rich alternative to more scientific studies in psychology and psychiatry.

Study this course and you will investigate psychological and psychiatric issues from an anthropological perspective, addressing issues at the forefront of debates in social policy, morality, personal identity, and mental health.

By considering cases from around the world you’ll explore how person, consciousness, and experience are shaped through cultural practices and political realities.

Examining world ethnography (including the UK), you’ll learn about selfhood, emotion, personality, and understandings of ‘madness’ and mental illness in cultural context.

Brunel students come from varied professional and academic backgrounds, many taking time out for professional development. If you haven’t studied anthropology before, you’ll be offered introductory modules in anthropological theory to help prepare you for the rest of the course.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork and you will be expected to get out of the library and undertake your own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present your findings in a dissertation.

Your fieldwork can be taken anywhere in the world, locally, previous students have explored psychic training, Pentecostal churches, and mental health charities, and internationally, students have explored subjects like funerals in Iran, Amazon neoshamanism, and autism programmes in Belgium.

A 30 month part-time option of the course is also available. If you wish to be considered for the part-time 30 month version, please make your application for the 24 month part-time route and then contact the Admissions team to request the change to the 30 month duration.

You can explore our campus and facilities for yourself by taking our virtual tour.

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Course content

The main objectives of this course are to provide you with a rigorous grounding in key topics and perspectives in psychological and psychiatric anthropology, and to equip you with a range of research skills to enable you to complete your research successfully.

Optional modules are indicative and available subject to numbers.

Please see programme specification for the specific optional module combination choices that are available.

This course can be studied 1 year full-time or 2 or 2.5 years part-time, starting in September.

Year 1

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Careers and your future

Through this course you will acquire analytical and research skills that can be used in a wide range of careers. In particular the course is ideal for enhances professional development in psychology, psychiatry, nursing, social work, education, social policy, charities and development.

There is also the opportunity for you to do further research for a PhD in psychiatric focussed anthropology.

This course will lead you to opportunities in range of career opportunities in the health sectors, including charities, development, NGOs, and anything requiring cultural expertise.

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UK entry requirements

  • A 2:2 (or above) UK Honours degree or an equivalent internationally recognised qualification.
  • Applicants with other professional qualifications will be considered on an individual basis.
  • Applicants will be interviewed either in person or by telephone.
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EU and International entry requirements

If you require a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK, you must prove knowledge of the English language so that we can issue you a Certificate of Acceptance for Study (CAS). To do this, you will need an IELTS for UKVI or Trinity SELT test pass gained from a test centre approved by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and on the Secure English Language Testing (SELT) list. This must have been taken and passed within two years from the date the CAS is made.

English language requirements

  • IELTS: 6.5 (min 6 in all areas)
  • Pearson: 58 (51 in all subscores)
  • BrunELT: 65% (min 60% in all areas)

You can find out more about the qualifications we accept on our English Language Requirements page.

Should you wish to take a pre-sessional English course to improve your English prior to starting your degree course, you must sit the test at an approved SELT provider for the same reason. We offer our own BrunELT English test and have pre-sessional English language courses for students who do not meet requirements or who wish to improve their English. You can find out more information on English courses and test options through our Brunel Language Centre.

Please check our Admissions pages for more information on other factors we use to assess applicants. This information is for guidance only and each application is assessed on a case-by-case basis. Entry requirements are subject to review, and may change.

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Fees and funding

2019/20

UK / EU

£8,000 full-time

£4,000 part-time

International

£15,400 full-time

£7,700 part-time

N.B. UK and EU applicants: the 30 month part-time course will not be eligible for a Postgraduate Loan. If you wish to be considered for the part-time 30 month version, please make your application for the 24 month part-time route and then contact the Admissions team to request the change to the 30 month duration.

More information on any additional course-related costs.

See our fees and funding page for full details of postgraduate scholarships available to Brunel applicants.

Fees quoted are per year and are subject to an annual increase. 

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Teaching and Learning

Brunel’s Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology MSc addresses learning in a lively and challenging way, through a programme of lectures, class discussions, and your own personally directed final dissertation research project.

The course is taught by a team of Brunel experts who have worked in many countries across the globe, including South, West and East Africa, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

Find out more about their particular research interests by following the links:

Should you need any non-academic support during your time at Brunel, the Student Support and Welfare Team are here to help.

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Assessment and feedback

Assessment is typically by essay or practical assignments (for example, analysis of a short field exercise), and a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words based upon your own fieldwork experience. There are no examinations.

Read our guide on how to avoid plagiarism in your assessments at Brunel.